Briefing

YouTube to change manual copyright claims in mid-September

Copyright owners of music will no longer be able to absorb the revenue from creators’ videos through the site’s manual-claiming tool. Previously, copyright owners could flag videos that contained their content, including music playing unintentionally in the background, and claim income from the videos that would otherwise have gone to the video creators. The new rules will require claimants to provide a timestamp of the infringed content, and will let creators remove sections of their videos that have been flagged. (TechCrunch)

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