Future of Work

LinkedIn wants to train Canada’s workforce. The Future Skills Centre is its way in

In this Monday, June 13, 2016, file photo, the LinkedIn logo appears on a screen at the post where it trades on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Microsoft will break out LinkedIn revenue when it reports its quarterly earnings Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2018. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
In this Monday, June 13, 2016, file photo, the LinkedIn logo appears on a screen at the post where it trades on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. AP Photo/Richard Drew, File
article-aa

Before the federal government closed applications for the Future Skills Centre—an arms-length government initiative aimed at pre-empting a labour market crisis—LinkedIn sent letters of support to each consortium that stands a chance of winning the bid for the $363-million fund. “This is the way we can have the most impact, by far,” Jake Hirsch-Allen, head of LinkedIn’s education umbrella in Canada, told The Logic of the company’s move to partner on the initiative.

Collaborating with the centre would be a boon for the Microsoft-owned company, which has made closing the skills gap part of its mandate through LinkedIn Learning, its education-focused branch. Indeed, it could be the company’s Trojan Horse into every corner of the country-wide labour-force retraining effort.

But some are raising concerns that the Future Skills Centre may be destined for trouble by self-selecting only institutions that can manage such a large sum of money, and by a system that could put the training focus in the hands of private corporations, like LinkedIn.

Purchase a subscription to read the full article.

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?