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    As low-Earth orbit satellite rivalries heat up, Canada’s Telesat claims steady progress

    Telesat CEO Dan Goldberg at the announcement of the federal government’s $85-million award and $600-million memorandum of understanding with the firm, at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum in Ottawa in July 2019.
    Telesat CEO Dan Goldberg at the announcement of the federal government’s $85-million award and $600-million memorandum of understanding with the firm, at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum in Ottawa in July 2019. The Canadian Press/Sean Kilpatrick
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    As one rival emerges from bankruptcy and another targets its home market of Canada, Ottawa-based Telesat still believes its upcoming constellation of low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellites will prove a winner in the race to provide high-speed internet from space.

    The firm has made “a huge amount of progress” on its technology and design over the last year, said Erwin Hudson, vice-president of Telesat LEO. He believes its long track record in the satellite market and conservative financial and technical approach will help make it a profitable operator. But one longtime space tech analyst says it’s not yet clear that there will be enough demand for LEO services to justify the billions of dollars companies are spending to launch their offerings.

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