article-aa

Loon, a subsidiary of the U.S. tech giant, plans to provide mobile internet connections by flying network equipment on balloons, while Tokyo-based HAPSMobile will use drones. Carriers China Telecom, Germany’s Deutsche Telekom, Spanish firm Telefónica, and Bharti Airtel of India are joining the two firms in an alliance to get spectrum and create uniform regulation and standards for high-altitude vehicles. So are Airbus, Nokia and Ericsson. (Reuters)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: The airborne efforts are designed to bring coverage to remote or sparsely populated areas where ground-bound network infrastructure would be difficult or uneconomical to install. But the carriers that have shown interest thus far typically operate in or across huge consumer markets. Despite the Alphabet unit’s Canadian icon-invoking name, Ottawa has chosen to look even higher in the sky to connect far-flung members of its smaller population. In July 2019, it made a $600-million deal with Ottawa-based Telesat for access to its low-Earth orbit satellite constellation, which will allow internet service providers to sell high-speed broadband in remote communities.

article-aa

Pending shareholder and regulatory approval, the two companies have agreed to a US$2.6-billion deal, including debt, that will see Cincinnati Bell shareholders receive US$10.50 per share. (The Logic)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: This latest purchase expands Brookfield’s presence in the global telecoms market. In July, its parent company, Brookfield Asset Management, was part of a consortium that spent US$2.3 billion to buy Vodafone’s telecoms in New Zealand. In October, it acquired a minority stake in Brazilian telecom Oi. And last week, Brookfield Infrastructure bought a 93 per cent stake in the U.K.-based Wireless Infrastructure Group for US$506 million, and purchased a telecom tower company in India from Reliance Jio for US$3.7 billion. It touted many of those deals in its third-quarter conference call with investors, which noted that it made $36 million in its data infrastructure funds from operations, almost double the amount earned in the year previous.

article-aa

The bureau will also look at competition in health, biosciences and infrastructure over the next year, according to its 2019–2020 annual plan released Thursday. (The Logic)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: The bureau details a list of hoped-for outcomes from its enforcement, including more choice and lower prices for internet and mobile products, a level playing field for infrastructure contracts and competitive medication prices. In particular, the bureau “will seek out and investigate deceptive marketing and anti-competitive practices, so that Canadians can enjoy greater trust in the online marketplace,” wrote Matthew Boswell, competition commissioner, in the report. This plan is just the first step. The bureau intends to develop a four-year plan that will look at how it can accommodate the accelerating pace of digital disruption. The bureau-wide explicit emphasis on the digital economy follows the hiring of its first-ever chief digital enforcement officer earlier in July, and the move to force Thoma Bravo to sell one of its software products in June.

article-aa

Canadian pay up to 80 per cent more for wireless plans in parts of the country that don’t have strong regional telecoms to compete with Bell, Telus and Rogers, the Competition Bureau said in a report to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC). In Quebec, Manitoba and Saskatchewan, which have regional competitors, 10-gigabyte plans can be as low as $60 per month; in provinces and territories without local players, the same plan can cost as much as $110 per month. (The Logic)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: The government has been considering ways to revise laws that protect Canada’s Big Three telecoms’ market share, which combined totals 89 per cent of the market. The CRTC is currently looking for ways to make wireless services more affordable. While the Competition Bureau offered a number of new data to inform that review, it didn’t provide specific recommendations on what the CRTC should do differently. The CRTC review is running at the same as an expert panel appointed by the federal government to suggest revisions to the Telecommunications Act, the Broadcasting Act and the Radiocommunication Act. One option for lowering wireless costs that’s been discussed in Ottawa is the one my colleague Zane reported on in November 2018: introduce foreign telecoms to the Canadian market. According to a secret government analysis, there’s no downside.

article-aa

The Elon Musk-helmed company is looking to offer services in Canada and the U.S. this year with the goal of reaching “near global coverage” by 2021. The public comment period on SpaceX’s Canadian application closes today. (The Globe and Mail)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: SpaceX will be competing with OneWeb and Telesat Canada, both of which have a head start in the country. Telesat received $85 million from the federal government in July 2019. Two months earlier, Virginia-based OneWeb said it would provide Canadian coverage. All three firms have approval from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission to operate satellites. SpaceX is looking for the green light from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission. All three companies are looking to provide high-speed internet for the 40 per cent of Canadians that live in rural areas and don’t have fast internet.

article-aa

It will require streaming services to contribute to the creation of Canadian content and make it easy to discover, Steven Guilbeault said at the Banff World Media Festival. Platforms that feature content from news outlets like will have to compensate them, mirroring recently adopted laws in France and Australia. (The Wire Report)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: Guilbeault said the government wants “nimble” regulation in response to fast-changing technologies. In January, a federal government-appointed panel called for broadcasting rules to be extended to all companies that air or host media in Canada, ending a Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) exemption for foreign digital services. The group also recommended giving the regulator power to audit firms’ use of algorithms, AI and data; Guilbeault said Tuesday the government will make unspecified changes to the CRTC, but won’t adopt all the panel’s suggestions.

article-aa

Ottawa should automatically review deals involving IP-holding or -generating companies in fields like AI, quantum computing, telecommunications, renewable energy, biotechnology, fintech and space technology, the Council of Canadian Innovators chair told a House of Commons committee on Monday. (The Logic)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: In April, the federal government signalled it would subject takeovers involving firms in public health or COVID-19 response supply chains to close scrutiny, as well as any launched by foreign state-owned enterprises. Balsillie argues that’s insufficient—and that the problem of foreign investment seeking to export Canadian IP extends beyond the pandemic. In February, for example, the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States gained new powers to look into deals involving critical technologies and sensitive personal data, regardless of size. But lawyers who specialize in such cases told the committee Monday that the current Investment Canada Act is sufficient. Ottawa can look into takeovers regardless of size on national security grounds, noted Omar Wakil, a Torys partner. And “blanket restrictions” could deter investment and international innovation cooperation, said Joshua Krane, a Blakes partner.

article-aa

The Chinese telecommunication company bought full-page spots in national newspapers and digital ads to celebrate the 20-year anniversary of its British business. Meanwhile, China’s ambassador to the U.K. Liu Xiaoming reportedly warned Whitehall that Chinese companies’ work on U.K. high-speed rail lines and nuclear power plants could be affected if the British government reduces Huawei’s role in 5G networks. (BBC, The Sunday Times)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: Engaging foreign media is a key part of the response plan the Wall Street Journal reports Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei drew up last year, following the arrest of his daughter and company CFO Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver and amid the U.S. campaign to dissuade countries from allowing its telecommunications equipment. The firm has also filed lawsuits against White House bans on buying from it, and increased R&D spending to find replacements for components U.S. manufacturers can no longer sell to it. But Huawei could reportedly run through its chip stockpiles in early 2021, and preventing a slowdown in demand for its equipment in countries like the U.K. won’t solve its supply issues.