article-aa

The CEOs of Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple faced pointed questions on the size and power of their companies in front of a congressional subcommittee. (The Logic)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: Democratic lawmakers focused their questions on antitrust issues, while Republicans inquired about supposed anti-conservative bias. The clash over how to question the CEOs included Democratic Representative Mary Gay Scanlon characterizing some Republican questions as a “fringe conspiracy theory,” as well as multiple shouting matches between lawmakers. They collected at least 1.3 million documents from the four companies, and released key ones throughout the hearing, including a 2012 email from Mark Zuckerberg, stating he was “buying time” by purchasing Instagram.

article-aa

The CEOS of four of the biggest U.S. tech companies are preparing to testify on antitrust issues before Congress Wednesday. The CEOs of Facebook, Apple, Amazon and Alphabet will defend their firms’ dominance in their respective markets, arguing against allegations that their size and power stifles competition. (The Washington Post)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg is expected to focus on America’s need to outcompete China’s emerging social media giants, while Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos could reiterate his message that the company uses its scale for good. Congress has been planning the inquiry for more than a year; lawmakers have gathered 1.3 million documents, conducted hundreds of hours of interviews and held five other inquiries to prepare for this one. The result will be a report on whether the Silicon Valley behemoths have violated competition laws and if those laws should be updated to reflect the digital age. On top of the congressional inquiry, the U.S. Justice Department is expected to file a monopolization case against Google, which, along with Facebook, is facing investigations by state attorneys general. Meanwhile, for the five largest U.S. tech firms—the four being questioned plus Microsoft—June was their biggest month for acquisitions since 2015.

article-aa

Monday’s scheduled appearance by the top executives of Amazon, Alphabet, Apple and Facebook will be pushed to August, as the late civil rights leader and congressman John Lewis lies in state at the U.S. Capitol. The hearings are part of an investigation by the U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee into the companies’ alleged monopolistic behaviour; a report is expected by late summer or early fall. (Axios, Reuters)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: The hearing will be the first time CEOs of Silicon Valley’s biggest firms have appeared together to answer lawmakers’ criticism of their growing market dominance, and a mark of the changing relationship between Big Tech and government. The 15-member panel has received 1.3 million documents from the companies so far to facilitate their 13-month investigation. According to Protocol, the executives “are getting off easy” by delivering their testimony virtually and doing so as a group “given the time constraints and the number of witnesses, lawmakers will never be able to probe all of the potential antitrust violations these companies are individually accused of.”

article-aa

Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Salesforce and Spotify are among the tech companies joining the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in asking a federal judge to block the White House’s July 6 directive to bar international students from staying in the country if their colleges move largely online in the fall due to pandemic lockdowns. (Axios)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: The U.S. has so far allowed international students to stay on visa throughout the pandemic by taking more online courses than usually permitted. The new rule revokes this allowance—a decision tech companies say does not consider “the loss of the tens of billions of dollars that international students contribute to U.S. GDP each year,” according to a court filing. International students in the U.S. contributed nearly US$41 billion to the economy in the 2018–2019 academic year, according to NAFSA: Association of International Educators. In an amicus brief filed Monday, the companies sided with Harvard and MIT, which filed a lawsuit last week, and said they would be “harmed substantially” if the students were removed. “Dropbox wouldn’t exist without immigrants,” a spokesperson for the company, which is part of the brief, told Protocol. Seventeen states and the District of Columbia are also suing the government on the issue. A federal judge is expected to rule by Wednesday.