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In the days following the New York Times investigation revealing he’d paid off at least eight of his accusers over three decades, the film producer sought support from a who’s who in the tech and entertainment industries. They included Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Netflix chief content officer Ted Sarandos and SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son, as well as Apple’s CEO Tim Cook and internet software senior vice-president Eddy Cue. (Variety)

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Talking point: The emails, contained within 1,000 pages of court documents unsealed following Weinstein’s February convictions of rape and sexual assault, read much like his legal defence: at once unrepentant and self-pitying. “I’m in a tough spot. Many of the allegations are false, but I need your help with this private letter of support,” he wrote to Cook and Cue. “There are many false allegations and over time, we’ll prove it, but right now, I’m the poster boy for bad behavior,” he wrote to Bezos. Today, Weinstein was sentenced to 23 years in jail.

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The agency is compelling the likes of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Microsoft and Google parent Alphabet to produce information regarding their past acquisitions of smaller companies. The demand marks an expansion of existing FTC and Justice inquiries into how those companies, and others, came to dominate—and whether that dominance is stifling competition. (The Wall Street Journal)

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Talking point: The size and sway of the biggest tech companies is a rare bipartisan concern in the other hyperpolarized American political sphere. Several Democratic presidential candidates—Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren included—want companies like Google and Facebook broken up into more manageable bits. President Donald Trump, meanwhile, has oft complained of the firms’ size and alleged ideological bias, which might explain both Justice and the FTC’s apparent zeal on the issue.

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Testifying before members of U.S. Congress, former BlackBerry executive Patrick Spence said the likes of Google and Amazon have “flooded the market with dramatically price-subsidized products” and control “roughly 85 per cent of the U.S. smart-speaker market.” He also said Google had refused access to its voice assistant when Sonos tried to add a feature to its speakers allowing users to choose between multiple such options. (The Logic)

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Talking point: Spence’s appearance was part of an investigation into Big Tech by the U.S. House Judiciary Committee’s antitrust group; other executives testifying similarly called for a curb to large firms’ dominance in markets like online advertising and ability to shut smaller companies out of their stores. Sonos in particular is battling its larger rivals on multiple fronts. Spence said it’s spending US$10,000 monthly on lobbying, and it’s also suing Google, claiming the larger firm copied its technology for its own Google Home smart devices. Not all committee members have been convinced. Republican Representative Ken Buck said he was concerned that government intervention could hurt innovation from small firms such as those testifying on Friday.