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Power subsidiary Sagard Holdings is investing US$75 million in the fund, called Sagard Healthcare Royalty Partners. The firm declined to disclose who any of the other investors are. The fund will invest in biopharmaceutical firms and seek to make money off royalties from medical devices and pharmaceuticals. (The Logic)

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Talking point: This is part of a broader diversification strategy by Power that includes investments in many of the country’s most prominent fintechs. Last month, Power co-CEOs Paul Desmarais Jr. and André Desmarais announced they were stepping down, and the firm is looking at removing its subsidiary, Power Financial, from the TSX. Power will have plenty of competition in the healthtech space. In November 2019, Montreal-based Amplitude Ventures announced a $200-million fund. The federal government is also investing $20 million in the space. Sagard Healthcare Royalty Partners has made one investment so far at just US$31 million, so it’s got plenty of money still at play, and is also keeping the fund open through 2020 for any new investors that want to participate.

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Those eight movies have earned more than US$10 billion in global ticket sales. Tenth-place Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker was released just last week, and will likely climb higher over the last eight days of the year. The other seven films are Avengers: Endgame; The Lion King; Toy Story 4; Captain Marvel; Spider-Man: Far from Home; Frozen II; and Aladdin(The Verge)

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Talking point: The blockbuster haul shows how important intellectual property and nostalgia continue to be for entertainment companies. Five of Disney’s top films are adaptations or sequels of stories originally created by acquisitions Marvel, Lucasfilm and Pixar. Two more are live-action remakes of its own early-1990s animated productions. Just one comes directly from source material from this decade: the sequel to the 2013 hit Frozen, although that, too, is loosely based on a Hans Christian Andersen story. The success of the movies, and the continued cachet of their underlying IP, are crucial to Disney’s strategy for its streaming service, the launch catalog for which was heavy on spin-offs. Rivals are still catching up. In July 2018, Netflix announced film adaptations of three comics from Millarwold, a publisher it acquired in 2017, but has yet to release them. Analysts have predicted consumers are unlikely to cancel other subscriptions in favour of Apple TV Plus because it lacks a back catalogue of hit shows and movies to watch between its handful of originals.

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The Swiss ticketing company’s CEO, Eric Baker, co-founded ticket resale platform StubHub in 2000, but left in 2004; eBay bought the company in 2007 for about US$310 million. The combined firm will operate in more than 70 countries. StubHub’s leadership—including president Sukhinder Singh Cassidy, a Canadian—will remain in place. (The Wall Street Journal, CNBC)

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Talking point: In the early 2000s, eBay bought up several startups it has subsequently spun out or sold off. The StubHub deal is another step in returning the company to its core e-commerce marketplace business. It follows eBay’s divestment of Skype to a private equity group in 2009, its spinout of PayPal in 2015 and the sale of its stake in South American platform MercadoLibre in 2016. Many of those moves came after pressure from activist investors, and the StubHub deal could help eBay keep them happier—it plans to use some of the money for stock buybacks and dividends.

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SIP has announced its first deal, participating in a US$16-million round in AMP Robotics, a Denver, Colo.-based startup that makes robots that claim to sort your recycling twice as fast as humans, and with much greater accuracy. (The Logic)

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Talking point: SIP was created just over two months ago by Alphabet company Sidewalk Labs (one of the largest seed investors in AMP Robotics) and the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan. The spinout company promised to look for innovative ways to deal with mobility, energy, water and waste, among other areas. SIP has said it will invest in technology “to enable sustainable, distributed and intelligent urban infrastructure, creating jobs, improving mobility, and providing more environmentally friendly infrastructure solutions.” Last month, AMP installed 14 AI-guided robots at Single Stream Recyclers in Florida, the largest global deployment in the recycling industry.

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Berlin-based Tier Mobility will use the money to fuel its expansion across the continent. The firm currently operates in 40 cities across 12 countries. (The Logic)

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Talking point: Lime president Joe Kraus said on Sunday the widespread use of similar hardware and operations in similar cities make European acquisitions unappealing. Last Thursday, Bird CEO Travis VanderZanden downplayed the potential for any new acquisitions. Lime has the market share to wait out smaller rivals—in September it became the first e-scooter company to hit 100 million rides—and Bird has the cash; the company raised US$275 million last week, backed by Montreal-based pension fund Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec. But the rapid growth of other European e-scooter startups is increasingly an issue for both companies. Tier Mobility, for example, had 10 million rides in 11 months of operation. It took Lime about 14 months to hit 11.5 million rides. Bird and Lime face little pressure in Canada, although they are increasingly contending with well-financed foreign firms. Spin, which is owned by Ford Motor Company, operates in Kelowna, B.C. Uber subsidiary Jump operates in Montreal.

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New York-based CTRL-labs creates tech that lets people control computers with their minds; it will join Facebook’s Reality Labs, which is developing augmented-reality smart glasses. CNBC sources said the deal was worth between US$500 million and US$1 billion, though a Facebook spokesperson said it was lower than US$1 billion. (CNBC)

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Talking point: Facebook has been working on this type of technology for three years as part of its efforts to expand into hardware. In a July update, the company said the technology’s potential was “significant,” but at least a decade away from commercialization. However, it hopes to use technology from the four-year-old CTRL-labs to create a wristband that can decode electrical signals sent from the brain through the spinal cord, allowing people to control their devices with their thoughts.

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Sidewalk Infrastructure Partners (SIP) was spun out of the Alphabet subsidiary and will focus its investments on technology-enabled infrastructure projects throughout North America. It will be investing in projects that require more than US$100 million of equity, as reported by The Wall Street Journal. The spinout was first mentioned in Sidewalk Labs’ Master Innovation and Development Plan, released in late June, though it did not say who its funding partners would be at the time.(The Logic)

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Talking point: SIP is distinct from Sidewalk Labs, and its existence is not contingent on Sidewalk’s Quayside deal with Waterfront Toronto moving forward. But if the deal does proceed, it could be used to make “SIP financing available as a potential option to those companies or partners ultimately designated to take on advanced infrastructure systems as part of the Sidewalk Toronto project,” said Keerthana Rang, associate director of communications for Sidewalk Labs. Waterfront Toronto, which continues to negotiate the Quayside project with Sidewalk Labs, told The Logic it was made aware of Thursday’s announcement within the last month. This isn’t the first time OTPP has made a bet on Alphabet: in January, it participated in Alphabet subsidiary Verily’s US$1-billion investment round.