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The social media platform cited the president’s tweets on Saturday, which threatened to use “the most vicious dogs” and “most ominous weapons” against participants in the George Floyd protests in Washington, D.C. if they entered the White House grounds. Snap said it did not want to “amplify voices who incite racial violence and injustice.” (The New York Times)

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Talking point: The move comes in response to Trump’s comments on another service—he did not replicate the messages on Snapchat—in contrast to companies that aren’t acting on the threats he’s posted to their own platforms, like Facebook. Snap will not remove the president’s account, which reportedly has over 1.5 million followers. The company was also a relatively early actor on the issue of disinformation, requiring publishers featured on Discover to post only fact-checked and accurate content.

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On the morning of the annual holiday that marks the end of slavery in the U.S., Tesla informed workers they could take the day off, unpaid. CEO Elon Musk tweeted on Friday afternoon that the day would “henceforth” be considered a holiday at his companies, quashing plans for protests from workers concerned about his “deafening” silence. Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai told Fortune his company is tackling issues of diversity with the same vigour applied to the challenges posed by the coronavirus. Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg promised to increase the number of Black people in leadership positions by 30 per cent over the next five years. Snapchat apologized for and removed a filter that saw chains appear and break when a user smiled. (The Logic)

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Talking point: The holiday has gained more attention following global protests sparked by the killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and Rayshard Brooks. Due to the efforts of HellaCreative, a group of mostly Black Bay Area tech creatives who launched HellaJuneteenth to push for the day to be a national holiday, several tech companies have committed resources to honouring the date. It remains to be seen how sustained these efforts will be: according to a new survey from Hired, Black and Hispanic tech workers are paid less than their white and Asian peers. On average, just 2.7 per cent of executives in senior roles at 10 major tech companies are Black. Ulili Onovakpuri, a partner at Kapor Capital and one of the few Black women partners in the venture capital industry, told The Information that these commitments are baseless without benchmarks. “That’s how you signal externally that you’re committed to this,” she said.

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Facebook has secured an exclusive deal with Plessey, one of the few AR display manufacturers, to buy all of its displays. Apple had previously tried to acquire the company. (The Information)

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Talking point: This deal allows Facebook to get the benefits of Plessey’s devices without facing the regulatory scrutiny that comes with an acquisition. It comes as Kitchener Ont.-based North, another AR-display maker, is looking for its own buyer. So is Florida-based Magic Leap, which has raised over US$2 billion. Industry-wide, AR firms are facing difficulties with coronavirus-related factory closures and tariffs from China. The tech giants remain keenly interested in the technology, however. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg predicted that, in this decade, “we will get breakthrough AR glasses that will redefine our relationship with technology,” and Amazon and Snapchat are rolling out or considering their own products.

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The probes, disclosed last year, looked into whether Snap misled investors on how competition from Facebook’s Instagram had impacted its app Snapchat’s growth. A separate class-action lawsuit from some investors continues. Snap stock was down 5.25 per cent at time of publication. (Reuters)

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Talking point: Snap may now be facing less scrutiny from regulators—the company said in its filing that it still believes the class action’s claims are “meritless”—but its stock still suffered after it reported its third-quarter earnings Tuesday. Despite posting lower-than-expected losses and increases in its user base, analysts were disappointed by its fourth-quarter revenue prediction of US$540 million to US$560 million. But it was still able to increase its user base to 210 million daily active users—its third consecutive quarter of growth—and a revenue of US$446 million, an increase of almost 50 per cent from the year previous.