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McArthur spent over six decades as a member of the Harvard Business School (HBS) community as a student and faculty member, including 15 years as the school’s dean. In 1984, he launched the Harvard Business School Press (incorporated as Harvard Business School Publishing in 1993). Born in Vancouver, he was a founding board member of the Canada Development Investment Corporation and served on several boards, including those of Telesat Canada and Bell Canada. He was awarded honourary doctorates at numerous academic institutions, including Simon Fraser University and the University of British Columbia, where he received a bachelor’s degree in forestry in 1957. In 2013, he was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada. He died on August 20 outside of Boston. (The Logic)

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Talking point: McArthur is credited for changing the culture of HBS: “We have to stress how human values, like ethics, relate to business decisions,” he told the Boston Globe in 1979. He chaired the Asia Pacific Foundation (APF) of Canada until 2015; the organization then established the John H. McArthur Distinguished Fellowship in his honour. Michael Bloomberg, the businessman and former New York City mayor, was named APF Canada’s second John H. McArthur Distinguished Fellow in January. McArthur was instrumental in the 1994 merger of two of the U.S.’s leading teaching hospitals—Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General—creating Partners HealthCare, where he served as founding co-chairman.

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The funding is part of a $312.5-million government program designed to build a national electric-vehicle charging-station network, as well as to back other low-carbon initiatives. More than 500 chargers are expected to be built this year through the initiative, and “hundreds more” over the next two. (The Logic)

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Talking point: Suncor is the only Canadian oil and gas producer to diversify its business with significant renewable energy projects, according to a 2018 report from Clean Energy Canada, a climate-focused think tank at Simon Fraser University. The move into electric-vehicle charging comes as the industry is growing more crowded in Canada. Volkswagen is building 32 stations between Calgary–Vancouver and Windsor–Quebec City. Tesla also plans to add dozens of stations to fill gaps in its network; for example, it has no stations in Saskatchewan or Manitoba up and running yet. And, in March, New Brunswick became the first fully connected province for electric vehicles.

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Global spending in the first half of 2019 totalled US$117.6 billion, a six-year low. Investments were down in the U.S., Europe and China. China’s drop was particularly pronounced at 39 per cent, but the country still invested the most in clean energy at US$28.8 billion, nearly a quarter of global investments. (Bloomberg)

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Talking point: The decreased spending follows an eight per cent dip in renewables investing in 2018 compared to the year before. While there’s been a rush of commitments by big corporations and institutional investors promising to invest more in clean energy, this data shows the amount of money isn’t increasing. The trend underscores how efforts to transition from fossil fuels aren’t necessarily widespread or consistent, even within companies. A 2018 report from Clean Energy Canada, a climate-focused think tank at Simon Fraser University, noted that Suncor was the only oil and gas producer to diversify its business with renewable energy, but that the company had reduced its number of clean tech projects from four to six between March 2017 and March 2018. And, while TC Energy was once a leader in renewable energy, it has also started selling off wind, solar and hydro assets.

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The report comes from Clean Energy Canada, a non-profit think tank based out of B.C.’s Simon Fraser University, and Navius Research, a Vancouver-based firm that focuses on the quantitative analysis of energy markets. It found that the clean energy industry contributes more to Canada’s economy than agriculture and forestry or the hotel and restaurant industries, and employed almost 300,000 people across Canada in 2017. (CBC)

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Talking point: The report’s findings outline that, while the sector is significant and growing—attracting more than $35 billion in investment in 2017—it remains largely unknown to most Canadians and is often not identified in statistics. While public awareness may be low, powerful investors and politicians are increasingly paying attention. In April, the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec (CDPQ)—which has $309.5 billion in assets under management—announced it was looking for investments in cleantech. The federal government is looking to invest $50 million in cleantech via the Venture Capital Catalyst Initiative. But not all of this is brand-new money: the Business Development Bank of Canada has had a $135-million fund focused on cleantech and energy since 2016.