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The ride-hailing firm’s new service, which it’s offering in partnership with Cornershop, is also available in Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Peru, and it intends to launch within the U.S. in the next month. “We look forward to expanding to more Canadian cities in the future,” Uber spokesperson Laura Miller told The Logic. Meanwhile, Winnipeg Mayor Brian Bowman, who had been trying to get Uber in his city since 2017, welcomed the company’s decision to finally launch there. (The Logic)

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Talking point: The Canadian product launches come after Uber cut staff in the country, sources with knowledge of the situation told The Logic, as part of a 3,700-person reduction to its global workforce. The grocery platform is part of a broader bet by Uber on food delivery. On Monday, Uber announced plans to acquire Postmates for US$2.65 billion, which would give it a 37 per cent stake of the U.S. food-delivery market. Uber has been preparing for its Canadian grocery launch for some time. In January 2019, The Logic reported that the company was hiring “for a new team that will transform how people get their groceries.” It’s entering an increasingly crowded Canadian grocery-delivery market that includes Instacart, Sobeys, Loblaw, Walmart and Costco. The surge in interest comes as between 1.5 per cent and 1.7 per cent of Canadians currently get their groceries online. That’s compared with seven per cent of people in the U.S. and 10 per cent in the U.K.

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Luge Capital, Panache Ventures and Intact Ventures also invested in Flinks, which is looking to open a U.S. office with the funds and double its 65-person staff in the next few months. (Betakit)

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Talking point: Flinks is also planning to use the funds for a new wealth management product. That’s a crowded, but lucrative, area of focus for a number of Canadian fintechs. In January, The Logic reported that Toronto fintech d1g1t was expanding to the U.S. after passing $50 billion in assets under management in part by partnering with large financial institutions. Flinks is taking a similar approach, and has relationships with several members of the Big Five banks in addition to projects it’s working on with National Bank. Flinks’s raise is the latest example of how fintechs continue to attract investors despite the pandemic. In London, for example, 39 per cent of all tech investment in 2020 so far went to fintechs.

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The networks offer faster data speeds for users. Bell also created a research lab at Western University as well as a campus-wide 5G network. (The Logic)

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Talking point: Earlier this month, Bell announced it would work with Ericsson to build its 5G network but left the door open to using the lower-cost Huawei if the federal government permits it. The federal government has been considering whether to permit Huawei in its networks since September 2018. Rogers launched its own 5G network in Vancouver, Ottawa, Montreal and Toronto earlier this year. The major telecoms had been trying to get suppliers in place ahead of the 3,500 Mhz spectrum auction, a key band for rural 5G deployments. Earlier this month Ottawa delayed that auction by six months to July 2021.

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Repare Therapeutics is reportedly within days of disclosing its plans to go public. (The Globe and Mail)

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Talking point: Repare would be the first Canadian biotech company to list on the Nasdaq in a year. Its potential success comes on the heels of Vancouver-based biotech firm AbCellera, which raised US$105 million earlier this week. Repare raised US$82.5 million in September 2019 to create drugs targeting cancerous tumours. The firm is now looking to get into human clinical trials by the summer. Listing on the Nasdaq is typical for early-stage drug developers, but Repare’s move would come despite a number of Canadian institutional investors seeking to get into biotech. In November 2019, for example, the Business Development Bank of Canada spun out a fund looking to raise $200 million to invest in the sector.

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The all-cash purchase of the secure file-exchange and communications firm will give OpenText access to XMedius’s customers, who’ve made over 50,000 installs of the app, and its employees, of which there are 230, according to LinkedIn. XMedius generates about $40 million in annual revenue; OpenText expects that to drop by up to 20 per cent in the first year post-acquisition. (The Logic)

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Talking point: XMedius is the latest big acquisition for the Waterloo-based business software company. In November 2019, it announced the US$1.42-billion acquisition of Carbonite, a Boston-based data security firm. At the time, CEO Mark Barrenechea said the company had more capital to spend on future acquisitions. While OpenText posted better-than-expected financials in its last quarter, it took a US$34-million restructuring charge—a sign of possible layoffs on the horizon as it integrates its new acquisitions into its sprawling portfolio of business management software and cloud services.

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After a brief dalliance, Montreal’s executive committee announced a ban on communal trottinettes-électriques from city streets, citing a near total and flagrant disregard for the city’s traffic bylaws. (CBC)

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Talking point: “We have to call this a failure,” said city councillor Eric Allan Caldwell of last summer’s pilot project with the battery-powered scooters. The numbers are telling: eight of 10 scooter users responsible for the more than 220,000 scooter trips on the island ignored the rules of the road—including the one against rolling on the damn sidewalk—and only 20 per cent obeyed parking restrictions. Montreal police issued 324 tickets for failing to wear a helmet, though either good luck or some sort of deity ensured no one was seriously injured. Montreal becomes the first major Canadian city to ban e-scooters after a trial; it follows several other e-scooter restrictions around the world, including across the U.K.

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The software provider aims to have data centres in 36 locations by the end of this year, in an effort to win more cloud market share from Amazon and Microsoft. (Reuters)

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Talking point: Montreal is increasingly becoming a hub for tech companies’ Canadian data centres, as my colleague Murad reported last month, in part a result of Quebec’s relatively cheap electricity. While Oracle stopped disclosing its cloud revenue in 2018, the company has been making several changes to find some momentum. It cut its cloud staff by up to 15 per cent last year to refocus its vision, and hired a former Amazon Web Services (AWS) executive as its chief marketing officer. The two companies have become increasingly bitter rivals in recent years, publicly slamming each other time and again. AWS led the market as of 2018, with about a 48 per cent share, according to data from Gartner. Oracle was not one of the top five providers.