article-aa

“The temporary economic lockdown triggered by the 2020 pandemic is giving us a glimpse into a not-too-distant future where the transformation of our energy system could disrupt demand on a similar scale,” Mark Little wrote in an opinion piece also co-written by Alberta Innovates CEO Laura Kilcrease for Corporate Knights, urging the energy industry to turn to new growth opportunities. (Corporate Knights)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: Suncor reported a first-quarter net loss of $3.53 billion, showing the Calgary-based company is feeling the pain from COVID-19 and resulting low oil demand. Little said he doesn’t expect a full recovery for Suncor or the Canadian energy sector until at least 2022. The challenges go beyond the pandemic: last month, Norway’s US$1-trillion wealth fund blacklisted Suncor for producing excessive greenhouse gas emissions. He addressed those issues in the column, in which he urged the industry to “focus investments on disruptive advantage” and develop low-carbon technologies “to commercial scale.”

article-aa

“If you can’t regulate yourselves, government will regulate you,” the infrastructure and communities minister said during a panel discussion hosted by the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) and Friends of Canadian Broadcasting. McKenna also raised the spectre of antitrust investigations into the likes of Facebook and YouTube, noting how Facebook has faced antitrust scrutiny in both the U.S. and the European Union. (The Logic)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: These comments follow a drumbeat of similar warnings in recent weeks from Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault. Herself a frequent target of online and real-life vitriol, McKenna said a recent analysis of her Facebook page revealed “110,000, violent, abusive, abusive [and] hateful posts” directed at her. Yet panelist Daniel Bernhard of Friends argued the country’s ultimate authority on social media hate should be the courts, not Parliament. “If a judge finds that the content is illegal and that a platform amplified it, then the platform should be held responsible. And not only that, but that the penalties should be commensurate to their revenue and size so that it hurts accordingly,” he said.

article-aa

Rod Sims, chair of the Competition and Consumer Commission, said the bill will make clear that Facebook and Google won’t have to share any additional data on their users, and that news providers can’t interfere with the platforms’ algorithms. But it will still require tech firms to pay media outlets for content, and establish an arbitrator to decide on price disputes. (ABC News)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: Earlier this month, Facebook said it would ban Australian users and publishers from sharing news links, citing in particular the lack of a cap on payouts. Google expressed concern about having to provide user data to news outlets. Sims’s changes address some of the tech giants’ stated issues. In Canada, Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault has repeatedly said he’s looking at the Australian example and similar rules in France, but hasn’t provided any details of his version. In January, a federally appointed panel recommended charging sharing platforms levies to fund the production of news content and requiring them to disclose details about their algorithms to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission.

article-aa

The European Democracy Action Plan will include rules on online disinformation, political advertising and election periods. European Commission vice-president Vera Jourova said larger platforms will have to take “more responsibility.” (Financial Times)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: Facebook’s submission to the regulatory process reportedly called for all tech firms to be subject to the similar rules on the grounds of fairness. But smaller companies could be disproportionately hurt by such requirements, according to the EU. Canada required platforms to establish registries of political advertising in the lead-up to and during the 2019 federal election, but set floors for English-, French- and other-language platforms of three million, one million and 100,000 monthly unique domestic visitors, respectively. Several large tech firms chose to ban such ads entirely, rather than set up databases. However, they won’t be able to opt out of the EU requirements, which cover a wider range of user activities.