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Chip Wilson will no longer be able to nominate one of the directors of the athleisure company he started. He owns 9.4 per cent of the firm. Lululemon said Wilson had failed to abide by the terms of his shareholder support agreement, but did not specify how. In October 2018, Wilson suggested he was considering a return to the company’s board this year, after leaving it in 2015.(Bloomberg)   

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Talking point: Wilson has been in a public—and largely one-sided—feud with the company ever since he resigned as chairman in 2013. He has consistently claimed the firm has no real growth strategy, going as far as to buy a street sign ad outside Lululemon’s Vancouver headquarters in February 2017, urging it to acquire competitor Under Armour. In 2018, Wilson released a memoir that complained of “five years of missed opportunity.” But under CEO Calvin McDonald, Lululemon’s stock is up 43 per cent this year. And, Wilson had trouble growing his next project after Lululemon. His family sold Kit & Ace—a more upmarket athleisure brand founded by his wife and son—to its executives last year. None of that is likely to make Lululemon want Wilson back any time soon.

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Lululemon, MEC and Arc’teryx are pulling their ads from Facebook in July in protest of the company’s inaction regarding hateful content on its platform. (CTV News)

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Talking point: The advertising boycott—in which the likes of Microsoft, Ford, Unilever, Coca-Cola and Honda are participating—follows repeated calls from civil rights groups and Facebook staff to remove or label a May post by President Donald Trump, which critics say encouraged violence against Black rights protesters. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has defended his decision to keep the post up, insisting it doesn’t violate the platform’s policies. New reporting from The Washington Post, however, reveals longstanding tension between Zuckerberg and Trump, which the Facebook CEO has tried easing in part by amending the firm’s policies to make them harder for the president—and other political leaders—to violate, according to The Post’s sources. On Friday, Facebook said it would add more context to problematic posts related to politics and elections. The move hasn’t convinced companies not to boycott the platform.

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Steph Korey, who co-founded the billion-dollar luggage startup in 2015, was the subject of an extensive piece from The Verge in which numerous pseudonymous employees excoriated the 31-year-old for being a verbally abusive bully on the company’s multiple Slack channels. Korey quickly apologized and resigned, but has since announced her return as co-CEO. (The New York Times)

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Talking point: The fulsomeness of Korey’s December apology was matched only by January’s repudiation of the article that helped push her out the door. “Frankly, we let some inaccurate reporting influence the timeline of a transition plan that we had,” Korey told The New York Times. Korey said she now disputes The Verge’s reporting and the “social media mob” it spurred, and has retained high-profile defamation lawyer Elizabeth M. Locke. The Verge is standing by the story, noting how Korey herself had said her behaviour and comments were “wrong, plain and simple.” Korey will share chief executive duties with Stuart Haselden, formerly of Lululemon Athletica.