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PublicAffairs and Harvard Business Review Press will be publishing Invent and Wander: The Collected Writings of Jeff Bezos, a collection of 23 years of the Amazon CEO’s annual letters, interviews, writings and speeches. (Fortune)

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Talking point: The book is set to be published in November. It is not an Amazon-sponsored project, but has had input from the company’s communications executives. It will highlight Bezos’s often-used phrases (“You can work long, hard, or smart, but at Amazon.com you can’t choose two out of three”) to details of the work culture he created at the company (“We don’t do PowerPoint … presentations at Amazon. Instead, we write narratively structured six-page memos. We silently read one at the beginning of each meeting in a kind of ‘study hall’”). Bezos’s latest communication is a message encouraging all meetings to be cancelled June 19—which, known as Juneteenth, marks the end of slavery in the U.S.—so employees can “reflect, learn and support each other.”

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Lawyers for the Amazon CEO said he would be willing to testify if Congress meets certain conditions around “timing, format, and outstanding document production issues.” The testimony would be part of lawmakers’ broad investigation into antitrust across the tech industry. (The Washington Post)

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Talking point: Bezos was initially reluctant to testify after House lawmakers accused Amazon of deceiving investigators about its business practices. The newfound cooperation comes as the e-commerce giant will reportedly face antitrust charges in Europe over whether it used third-party data to help develop its own products. Lawmakers have also called on Apple CEO Tim Cook, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai to testify, following their years-long investigation into potential anticompetitive practices among Silicon Valley’s tech giants; none of the other companies have publicly confirmed their participation.

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Teams led by Blue Origin, the Amazon CEO’s sub-orbital space-flight services company, and Musk’s SpaceX are two of three companies splitting a 10-month, US$967-million study contract to build lunar landers, a key part of the space agency’s push to put astronauts on the Moon by 2024. (CNBC)

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Talking point: Bezos’s outfit pocketed US$579 million of the contract, with SpaceX scoring a US$135-million tranche to develop its “lunar optimized Starship.” Dynetics, a subsidiary of defence contractor Leidos, received US$253 million. NASA is expected to pick the winning craft before the end of 2024—more than half a century since the last crewed Moon landing.

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Sold over four days, the nearly 811,000 shares represent about three per cent of the CEO’s total holdings in the company he started in 1994. (The Logic)

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Talking point: Bezos reportedly sold the stock, worth a little less than the GDP of Guyana, to fund Blue Origin, his galactic exploration company committed to building “a road to space.” In doing so, Bezos almost eclipsed the news that he’s being sued by his girlfriend’s brother, whom Bezos claimed leaked intimate photos of the bullet-headed e-commerce pioneer to the National Enquirer. How was your week?

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Two influential “special rapporteurs” with the intergovernmental organization said they were “gravely concerned” at the apparent surveillance of the world’s richest man by one of its most conspicuous dictators. A Saudi government official called the allegations “silly.” (The Guardian)

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Talking point: The alleged hacking began in May 2018, when Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman reportedly sent Bezos a picture via WhatsApp of what the rapporteurs called “a woman resembling the woman with whom Bezos is having an affair, months before the Bezos affair was known publicly.” What followed, according to a forensic analysis, was a massive migration of data from Bezos’s iPhone. Bezos was later the subject of a January 2019 National Inquirer exposé detailing his affair with former broadcaster Lauren Sanchez—though American Media, which owns the tabloid, said it harvested the dirt from Sanchez’s brother. In an apparent response Wednesday, the Amazon entrepreneur tweeted a picture of himself at a memorial for journalist Jamal Khashoggi, a columnist at the Bezos-owned Washington Post who was murdered in 2018, allegedly at MBS’s behest.

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At a company summit for merchants in New Delhi, the CEO also said the company is aiming to have US$10 billion worth of export transactions involving Indian-made products through its marketplace by 2025. (LiveMint)

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Talking point: Amazon and other foreign-controlled e-commerce platforms operating in India face a major challenge keeping small merchants happy. Bezos’s Delhi visit was met with protests. Corner-store operators—“kiranas,” in your correspondent’s native Bombay—argue online discounting unfairly undercuts them. Neighbourhood traders are a key political constituency for the ruling party, and it has shaped the country’s e-commerce policy to suit them. In December 2018, it introduced rules targeting listing practices commonly used by Amazon and Walmart-owned Flipkart; in November 2019, it reportedly planned to offer subsidies for small retailers to go online, as well as to adopt accounting software and digital payments. Amazon also needs to court these firms to hold off Reliance Industries, one of India’s largest conglomerates, which this month launched a grocery-delivery service that works with local stores.

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The multi-billionaire Amazon mogul, who also owns the Washington Post, has become close to several NFL team owners—and would be happily welcomed by league, according to unnamed league sources who spoke to CBS Sports. (CBS Sports)

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Talking point: While none of the 32 teams are presently up for sale, the NFL wields tremendous economic clout and its owners can exert considerable political pressure in their markets. Bezos is increasingly making a play for political influence; Amazon has spent more money lobbying in Washington than any other company so far this year. The company also spent US$1.5 million backing pro-business candidates in the Seattle municipal election, though the effort backfired, with one candidate elected in part on a promise to tax the tech giant. Bezos reportedly also called fellow billionaire Michael Bloomberg earlier this year to ask him to run in the 2020 U.S. presidential election. Bloomberg, who would be pro-business compared to many other Democratic candidates, threw his hat in race semi-officially last week.

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Gildan’s Glenn Chamandy was the top Canadian in the Harvard Business Review rankings, at 49th place. Bell’s George Cope and Sun Life’s Dean Connor also made the list, which looks at both financial and environmental, social and governance (ESG) performance. (Harvard Business Review)

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Talking point: This is the first time since 2014 Bezos hasn’t come first—and he didn’t even make the top 100, largely because of a methodology change that increased the importance of ESGs in the rankings. Harvard Business Review changed its methodology because both companies and investors are increasingly focused on more than just the bottom line. In August, for example, the CEOs of 181 of the most powerful companies in the U.S. announced that a corporation has a broader social remit and should not focus solely on helping shareholders. The Canadian CEOs on the list were generally bolstered by stronger ESG metrics than financial ones. Brookfield Asset Management’s Bruce Flatt was an outlier; although he did much better on financial performance than any other Canadian CEO—reaching 25th place overall—he ranked 855th on one of the ESG metrics.

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His plan involves adding 100,000 electric vans to the company’s delivery fleet by 2024, investing US$100 million in reforestation projects and launching a new website to report the company’s progress on reducing emissions. If successful, it expects to meet the Paris Climate Agreement targets 10 years ahead of schedule. The firm is calling on other companies to match its ambitions. “If a company with as much physical infrastructure as Amazon … can meet the Paris Agreement 10 years early, then any company can,” it said in a press release. (The Logic)

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Talking point: Thursday’s announcement comes on the eve of a global climate strike that is expected to feature millions of protesters, including more than 1,000 workers in Amazon’s retail and technology divisions. This isn’t the first time Amazon workers have pressured the firm to reduce its emissions; for nearly a year, an internal group called Amazon Employees for Climate Justice has been asking the company for a report on the risks climate change poses to its business and how it plans to reduce its fossil-fuel dependence. Shareholders called for the same thing at this year’s annual general meeting, but Amazon rejected the resolution.