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The announcement comes in the wake of China’s legislative crackdown on the island region of 7.5 million—including some 300,000 Canadian citizens. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the government is considering further measures to accommodate those who wish to flee as a result of the legislation, which China imposed on Hong Kong this week. (The Logic)

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Talking point: Conceived in the wake of last year’s protests against Chinese rule, the new security laws hem in Hong Kong’s longstanding autonomy, under which the region has remained a liberal exception to the government’s rule. Exactly how the new laws—which dramatically increase China’s surveillance and intelligence-gathering powers—will affect the region remains unclear; so far, many businesses have said it won’t affect commerce. But they could soon offer another test of Big Tech’s principles.

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In a joint statement, Foreign Affairs Minister François-Philippe Champagne said the move could undermine the “enhanced trust in governments and international cooperation” required to combat COVID-19. The signatories also claim Beijing is not living up to commitments made when the territory reverted from British colonial rule. (The Logic)

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Talking point: The statement comes the day after a B.C. judge ruled that the extradition trial of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou can proceed, a decision that diplomatic and security experts predicted would prompt retribution from the Chinese government. Last week, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau directly accused Beijing of detaining Canadian citizens Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig as “retaliation” for Meng’s arrest. He also said China does not understand or have an equivalent to Canada’s independent judicial system; Champagne’s statement similarly claimed the national security law’s application to the territory “raises the prospect of prosecution in Hong Kong for political crimes.”