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“C.D.” claimed he suffered anxiety, nightmares and panic attacks after his name appeared on a list of alleged aggressors that circulated on Facebook pages “Dis son nom” (say his name) and “Victims voices,” as well as on Facebook-owned Instagram. The man, who said he has a common Quebec name and that there was no indication he was the target of the allegations, nonetheless said his friends and wife asked him about it. Though the list was eventually removed from the sites, it was still readily accessible. “Social media, notably those owned by Facebook, are not appropriate forums for [sexual misconduct] victims to obtain justice, given the inability to verify and validate the veracity of the anonymous allegations,” reads the class-action request, which was filed in the Superior Court of Quebec. (La Presse)

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Talking point: Similar allegations have hit Quebec’s cultural and political milieux over the last several weeks—with some of the alleged perpetrators also pushing back. Notably, Bloc Québécois leader Yves-François Blanchet said he hasn’t ruled out legal action against a Facebook group that published allegations that he attempted to exchange cocaine for sex in the bathroom of a Montreal bar in 1999.

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The lawsuit centres on Bell’s now-discontinued Relevant Advertising Program (RAP), which tracked the telecom’s customers’ internet, phone and television activity and made profiles for third-party advertisers to target their ads with. The suit is expected to progress later this year, or in early 2020. (Toronto Star)

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Talking point: Bell could owe hundreds of millions in damages because of the program if the suit is successful. But it also has broader implications for tech giants that have made large profits by offering products for free and collecting user data to sell advertising in exchange. Bell isn’t the only company facing this kind of class action. Facebook is up against a similar suit in British Columbia, where residents in the province—as well as in Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Newfoundland and Labrador—are alleging the firm used their images without their knowledge in an advertising program that’s since been pulled.

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The share of principal applicants among economic-class immigrants who’d previously earned income in Canada rose from 11.5 per cent in 2000 to 59 per cent in 2018, according to a Statistics Canada study released Wednesday. (The Logic)

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Talking point: The agency attributed the shift to the increasing number of temporary foreign workers admitted over the near-two-decade period, and the growing importance within the country’s economic-class immigration system of a federal program that selects for Canadian experience as well as provincial nominee programs. New arrivals are also increasingly drawn from the well-compensated—almost a third of this larger pool in 2018 earned more than $50,000 annually pre-immigration, a 10 percentage point increase from 2000. Canada is increasingly moving toward a “two-step migration system” for economic-class arrivals, University of Waterloo economics professor Mikal Skuterud told The Logic last month, noting that also includes international students who get post-graduate work permits before becoming permanent residents. Domestic work experience is “a very strong predictor of success in the Canadian labor market, if you’ve had some work experience before,” he said.