article-aa

Alternative sources being considered include cellphone, credit and transactional data, as well as satellite imagery, to shore up the more than 350 surveys it conducts. (Financial Post)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: The surveys, which collect data on everything from the number of homicides to the price of wool, have been key in taking the pulse of Canadian society and economy. Yet much like polling companies, StatCan has seen declining participation in the exercises, according to the country’s chief statistician, Anil Arora. The country’s privacy commissioner has criticized the agency’s collection of credit data without consent, and a plan to collect banking records.

article-aa

The industry association, which represents 60 banks, is calling for new laws at the federal and provincial levels to allow them to start accepting digital IDs. Digital IDs are more secure and accurate than paper ones like driver licences, according to CEO Neil Parmenter. (Bloomberg)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: If the law changes banks would have access to a huge amount of highly-sensitive personal information on Canadians. When StatsCan tried to collect banking information earlier this year, the CBA loudly objected. The difference: Statistics Canada wanted to collect data to perform anonymized aggregate analysis informing government policy. Banks can use the data to upsell current customers and potentially resell data to third parties, both of which could be highly lucrative. Canada’s six largest banks intend to launch a system called Verified.Me later this year, which would be a unified digital ID accepted across their businesses. For that to scale, they need federal and provincial governments to start allowing digital ID, as well, and to create an integrated system between levels of government.

article-aa

In a written submission to the government’s National Digital and Data Consultations, Daniel Therrien proposed that any new law include “enforceable rights” for individuals, and that his office be given the ability to compel disclosure and issue fines to organizations that fail to comply. He also reiterated his call that Canadian political parties be subject to privacy laws. (Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada)

Read this article for free

By entering your e-mail you consent to receiving commercial electronic messages from The Logic Inc. containing news, updates, offers or promotions about The Logic Inc.’s products and services. You can withdraw your consent at anytime. Please refer to our privacy policy or contact us for more details.

Already a subscriber?

Talking point: Therrien’s office is currently investigating two instances of the use of personal information that have caused widespread concern: the Facebook-Cambridge Analytica scandal, and Statistics Canada’s proposed pilot project using banking data. The enforcement powers he’s seeking were also recommended by a House of Commons committee reviewing federal privacy regulation. And, they’re similar to those recently given to Britain’s privacy commissioner, Elizabeth Denham. Denham was interim privacy commissioner in Canada in 2008, and issued a report on Facebook’s handling of user data that foreshadowed the current scandal. Back then, the company treated her report and recommendations “as more like advice,” Denham told the International Grand Committee on Disinformation last week.